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Raw Coconut Flour (from dried coconut)

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raw-coconut-flour-store-bought12In several of my raw recipes you will see coconut flour being used.  Even as you travel the web of raw recipes, you will see other chefs using it as well.  But before you run to the cabinet and measure out the flour, stop and make sure that you know exactly what they are referring to.  Coconut flour can mean one of two things;  they are either using a raw coconut flour that you can purchase at the grocery store or they are making their own.

Here are just a few ways that you can make coconut flour:

  • Homemade coconut flour using dried coconut flakes and blitzing them to a powder in a blender.  This flour has a higher fat content and won’t be as drying to a recipe.
  • Highly processed, ultra-white coconut flour.  This flour isn’t raw and I don’t recommend it.
  • Store bought raw coconut flour.  I recommend Coconut Secret brand.
  • Raw coconut flour made from coconut milk pulp.  This is made by placing dried coconut and water in a blender.  After blending, strain the milk through a nut bag.  The stuff that is left in the bag is called pulp.  Spread this on a dehydrator sheet, dry, then process into a fine coconut flour.   This type of flour has less fat.

I will always be using one of two types of coconut flour;  store-bought raw coconut flour  or the type of the flour that is made from dried coconut that has been blitzed into a powder.    Keep in mind that they can’t be substituted for one another.  The reason for this is that the store bought coconut flours absorb a lot of moisture from the recipe, which can make the outcome dry and crumbly.  And as I mentioned above, when I powder dried coconut, it is higher in fat therefor won’t absorb the moisture in your recipes.   I don’t make coconut flour from coconut pulp simply because I never have  enough of it on hand.

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Interesting facts about Raw Coconut Flour:

  • It is 100 percent gluten-free: Since there is no gluten in coconut flour, this ideal for anyone with gluten intolerance.
  • Coconut flour is a high fiber food: Contains more fiber than any other flour — almost 58 percent more, which makes reaching your daily fiber intake possible!
  • Can help assist in weight loss: Since dietary fiber assists in controlling glucose levels, it may help control blood sugars.
  • Very low in carbs.
  • It has a mildly sweet coconut taste.
  • Sometimes it will be necessary to increase the liquid content in coconut flour recipes.  Coconut flour loves moisture and will absorb a lot of the liquids in recipes.
  • Dried coconut is a great source of copper, which helps to maintain the health of your brain.   It activates enzymes responsible for the production of neurotransmitters.
  • Always use unsweetened dried coconut,  sweetened dried coconut has 2 teaspoons of added sugar per ounce!
  • Dried coconut is cholesterol-free, very low in sodium, and high in manganese.

 

Homemade coconut flour with dried coconut:

Ingredients: yields 1/2 cup powdered

  • 1 cup shredded

Preparation:

  1. Place the shredded coconut in either a blender, spice or coffee grinder.   Blend until it reaches a powder form.  That’s it!
  2. Store in an airtight container until ready to use.

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 Or you can make your own…

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26 thoughts on “Raw Coconut Flour (from dried coconut)

  1. Shelley says:

    Hi Amie Sue, great idea! Does it have to be shredded coconut or will desiccated be ok? xx

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello Shelley,

      Desiccated coconut is coconut meat which has been shredded or flaked and then dried to remove as much moisture as possible. Desiccated coconut is unsweetened (but always check the ingredient label), this is not to be confused with coconut flour, which has the fat removed;

      Dried coconut content tends to have a higher moisture content than full-on desiccated coconut.

      I thought I would share that in case others are not sure what the difference is between the two. To answer your question, yes, using either should be fine. Just know that the desiccated coconut might be a bit “drier”.

      amie sue

      • demi says:

        hi…I am a bit slow when it comes in homemade gf flour so plz could you help me?now store bought coconut flour is expensive,so I buy coconuts instead.now to make coconut flour same as store bought to use it in recipes that absorb liquid as store bought….what should I do?first make coconut milk and then dry and grind?or just shred fresh meat,dehydrate and grind it?i know you said it somewhere above in the article but like I said…I am a bit slow…hahaha.sorry.i have tons of recipes but I cant buy expensive flour and prefer to make it my own but at the same time I don’t want to ruin the recipes and lose all the ingredients too.thanks

        • amie-sue says:

          Good morning Demi,

          I haven’t made my own coconut flour from fresh coconut meat before so until I do, I can’t give you instructions with confidence. You can make coconut milk and then dry the coconut pulp, thus grinding that into a flour but not sure it will end up just like store bought. I am afraid that is a different process all together since it is a processed product at the store. Are you baking with this coconut flour or are you wanting it for raw recipes? Have a blessed weekend, amie sue

          • demi says:

            thanks…i wonder if i make coconut milk and make coconut flour from the pulp…will it be th esame ratio in recipes call for coconut flour?like all these recipes that need half cup flour with many eggs,will homemade do the job and be more moist or it wont be same as store bought?i am afraid i will ruin the recipes i have found online that uually call for store bought

            • amie-sue says:

              Great question Demi but I don’t know the answer to that. I don’t do any real baking and I know coconut flour works in certain ways in recipes. My best advice to try one recipe and see how it turns out. amie sue

  2. Alyssa says:

    I love your site, very informative! Thanks for posting! How do you dry your coconut?

    Thanks,

    Alyssa

  3. Grace says:

    Thanks for this explanation, now I understand why the things I made with store bought coconut flour were so dry and disappointing. I love this idea of making your own!
    Grace

  4. Diana says:

    Amie-Sue, thank you so much for another great tip! I’ll be trying the coconut pieces/water version, myself. Sounds great!

    I love the beautiful look, and also the efficiency (lovely when you can get both looks and practicality all in one!), of the lovely 3-bowl with lid storage you’re picturing here. Is this something that you put together that just worked, or did you buy this as a set! I think keeping 3 types of flour in it is brilliant!

  5. Elzbieta Kaminski says:

    Amie Sue,

    You made my DAY! Thank you so much for this……yesterday I made treats for my dogs. The coconut flour I bought it to make the biscuits turned into dry crumbly. I was sort of not happy about this and wonder WHY! You have answered mine. You rock!

    One more thing..I love the glass of bowl demonstrated here. Where can I find it? I love how you decorated this. Awesome!!!

    Have a good day!
    Elzbieta

  6. Leslie says:

    Sooo, how does one know when to use which?

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello Leslie… it will always depend on the recipe and what the end result is that is being desired. For the most part, the store bought raw coconut flour will be used in small quantities, never the main “flour” being used. There isn’t a black and white answer to this question. I would use the store bought in conjunction with other flours. If you make your own just by blitzing the dried coconut, you can use it as the main flour because it won’t be too dry and crumbly. If you ever come across one of my recipes that has coconut flour in it and you question which one is being used, just ask me. amie sue

  7. Tricia says:

    I was to tickled to see your “coconut flour” this morning. A couple of days ago after making my own coconut milk I noticed the amount of pulp I had was building up. I thought, “hmm, I wonder if I can make flour from this if I dry in first in my dehydrator”. Well I was so proud of myself when after drying the pulp and placing it in the Vitamix I had this great flour. I was sure I had seen recipes that call for it or figure I can even substitute it for other flours (I am celiac). Now after reading the above, I am even more pleased! Thanks again for sharing. You’ve made my day!

    • amie-sue says:

      Don’t you just love how things work out sometimes. :) That is just awesome Tricia. I am so sorry to hear that you are celiac but so thankful that there are wonderful alternatives out there…in the long run being forced to omit gluten out of your diet just might be a blessings in disguise. Have a wonderful day, amie sue

  8. Glorianne says:

    Hi Amie Sue,
    We just relocated to the Big Island of Hawaii and our son is a gatherer of MANY coconuts. Yesterday we made the best milk with the shakers and the young coco water from the others. OMG it’s like the best cream in the world. I took some of the younger meat and blended it with tamari, ginger and other spices and made leather in my Excalibur to make noodles from for pad thai. I felt so wastelful throwing out the pulp but didn’t want to use it to make the flour because I want it to have the fat. Do you think I could dry some of the meat and then grind it to make my own flour instead? LOVE LOVE LOVE your site and recipes. ALWAYS inspiring! xoxo

    • amie-sue says:

      Ohhh I wish I was there to enjoy your abundance of coconuts! How divine! :) Making leathers from coconuts are just so wonderful and versatile. You can surely dry the meat and grind it down but I think it would have close to the same amount of fat as the pulp, if not more since nothing is being strained out. Does that make sense? I would still always dry the pulp if you find yourself making more coconut milks. Even just using in small quantities would add such wonderful nutrients to recipes. Or find a friend who might want it. :)

      I am so happy that you are enjoying my site. Please keep touch and enjoy the warmer weather! hugs, amie sue

  9. Elzbieta Kaminski says:

    Amie Sue,

    I sent the message this morning and have not posted it up?
    Where did you get that 3 glass bowls with lid? Testing to see if this message gets it through or not.

    Have a good day!

    Elzbieta

    • amie-sue says:

      Hi Elzbieta… just so you know… when you post a comment it doesn’t show up immediately. It waits for me to approve and answer it. :) I do my best to answer all the questions on my site, every day! This way, questions don’t go unseen and unanswered, plus I can control spam. I just answered your question so refer to that for where to get the glass containers. Have a great day, amie sue

  10. andrew says:

    Hi Miss Amie! I love your site, it is incredible. Do you make your own shredded coconut? I just read a previous comment up there where you said you don’t dry your own coconut.

    Does this mean you buy your shredded, dehydrated coconut flakes in the store and then you make the flour out of those? Has it ever been of interest to you to make the shredded coconut flakes fresh from scratch with your dehydrator and fully intact cconuts?

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello Andrew :)

      So happy that you are enjoying me site.

      That is correct, I don’t make my own dried coconut. I purchase mine right now. Whole, mature coconuts are not a main staple in the grocery store and they are spendy… so I just buy it dried. One day though, I would love to give it a try. :) Do you make your own? Have a great evening, amie sue

  11. Julia Edwards says:

    Hi there, i am based in South Africa and at the moment everyone is on the banting diet (LCHF) and of course this has led to a high demand in all the natural baking ingredients. One in particular is Coconut Flour and if it is available it is in small volumes and not to forget the price is very high.
    So for me it is with extreme interest i ask the following question: can i make coconut flour out of coconut flakes, as per the instructed diagrams above and secondly what would be the shelf life from date of blending?
    Thanking you in advance,
    Julia

    • amie-sue says:

      You sure can Julia… that is what this whole post was about. :) I don’t know the exact length of time but if you can store it in the fridge or freezer it will extend the shelf life. Maybe 3-6 months if well sealed.

      Have a great day, amie sue

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