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Raw Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

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raw-oatmeal-cookies-1This morning I woke up to the sensual aroma of Oatmeal Raisin cookies!  The dehydrator was pushing out these amazing smells that quickly awakened my senses.  They smelled so warm and delicious.

My husband had one after lunch and he loved it, which he isn’t to fond of oats.  So that is a great sign.  A friend ours, Jason,  had one and he said it was amazing.  He shared that Oatmeal Raisin cookies are one of his all time favorites.  So,  when someone compliments a creation like that, it’s the best kind of all.

We all have childhood favorite foods that carry on into adulthood.  Those foods are most likely cooked foods that are loaded with unhealthy fats, sugars and flours.  So when someone takes a bite of a raw, healthy creation and it immediately takes them back to an old-time favorite comfort food (cooked version) and find it just as good, well, need I really say more?

Raw outs are becoming more available on the market.  If you are truthfully concerned about consuming only raw ingredients be sure to really double-check with the manufacture.  Most oats are lightly steamed to prolong their shelf life.  You can read a short snippet here about different oats.

 

Ingredients: yields 15 (3 Tbsp) cookies

  • 2 cups gluten-free, rolled oats, soaked & dehydrated
  • 1 cup oat flour
  • 1 cup apple puree
  • 3/4 cup raw almond butter
  • 1/4 cup raw agave nectar
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup raisins

Preparation:

  1. Make your own oat flour using your food processor.  Pour in  1 cup of oats and process to a fine powder.
  2. Make your own apple puree using your food processor by placing your diced and cored apples ( you can leave the peel on ) in the FP, using your “s” blade, process to small to medium pieces.
  3. In a medium-sized bowl combine all the ingredients and mix well.
  4. Using an ice cream scoop, place your dough on the teflex sheets of your dehydrator trays.
  5. Dehydrate for 1 hour at 145 degrees (why? read here), then decrease to 115 degrees (F) for 8-10 hours.  It depends on how thick your cookies are.   They won’t dehydrate to a crispy cookie due to the fat content in the almond butter.
  6. About 4 hours in,  turn your cookies over onto just the mesh dehydrator sheet and continue dehydrating to your desire texture.
  7. I recommend storing these in a sealed container in the fridge due to the remaining moisture in the cookie.  I like to wrap each cookie individually in plastic wrap.  This makes it easy to grab one and head out the door, having a healthy snack in hand for later.  Plus,  because there is still moisture in this cookie, they tend to stick together a bit if stacked on one another.

Do you have questions about rolled oats?

  • Amie Sue, is it possible to purchase raw oats?  Yes, indeed.  Please read here where can order them (here).
  • I always heard that oats contained gluten.  Is this true?  No, but you need to be aware of the oats that you buy. .  Please read (here).
  • Is it important to soak and dehydrate oats?  I think it is, read (here) as to why.
  • Can I use regular cooking rolled oats in these recipes instead of raw oats?  Yes, that is your call.  I still recommend the soaking process.

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15 thoughts on “Raw Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

  1. Annie says:

    Aimee Sue,
    I’d love to try these, and wonder what you think about substituting coconut flour for the oat flour? I just got some but haven’t really experimented much with it. I suppose it is a much finer grind, so do you think would that affect the end result?
    Just have to say again, your recipes are INCREDIBLE! No one makes raw desserts the way you do!
    Thanks, Annie

    • amie-sue says:

      Good evening Annie,

      So good to hear from you. :) Well shoot…I would give the coconut flour a shot. It will be a bit finer but I really don’t think it will mess up the texture much. It might impart a bit more coconut flavor but who’s to say that won’t taste good. If you are leery, cut the recipe in 1/2 so you can do a test run on it and if you do, please let me know how it turns out!

  2. Patty Richards says:

    amie-sue,
    Good morning from the Pacific Northwest. I was very fortunate to get your website from a farmer’s market in Hood River and have had a great deal of fun making several of the recipes all turning out very good. But, I made this oatmeal cookies recipe and they turned out like big hard haystacks—but still very tasty. Was I suppose to soak the oats? I have been soaking everything and I thought it was interesting t I used them right from the store and I think that is why they turned out so stiff and hard.

  3. Patty Richards says:

    amie-sue
    Patty here!
    OOPs! I must have hit a wrong button on the computer and it sent my message not finish! Sorry!! So just to clarify was I suppose to soak the oats in the oatmeal cookie recipe in order to avoid the large haystacks next time? Thanks for all the good recipes and beautiful website.
    Enjoy,
    Patty

    • amie-sue says:

      Hi Patty,

      You know when I made those cookies back then, I didn’t soak them. It is always best to do so so help remove the phytic acid to make it easier for digesting. When you made the cookies did you just drop them on the dehydrator sheet and leave as is? Sometimes I leave them nice and high like that but most often I flatten them with the fingers. You can control the shape and size to fit your preference. But hard? hmmm, maybe they dehydrated to long? You can try to soften them up some by putting them in a sealed container with a wedge of apple. See if that helps. I hope this helps. :) My husband and I LOVE Hood River…hoping to have a home there during the summer! Have a great weekend, amie sue

      • patty richards says:

        Amie-sue,
        Thanks for your reply. I didn’t soak!!!! I should have known better. I know that is why they got so hard. I didn’t press down either next time I will. I love them this way anyway.
        I have tried many of your recipes and love them all. My husband and his buddies also love being guinea pigs. It has been a lot of fun for someone who didn’t like to cook much!
        Hope to see you someday in Hood River.

        In good health,
        Patty

        • amie-sue says:

          Patty,
          My husband and friends love being a test taster as well. :) Stay inspired in the kitchen! Give Hood River a hug for me. hehe

  4. Naomi says:

    Hi Amie, first I wanted to thank you for sharing your amazing recipes that is so generous of you. I would like to ask your opinion on making some oatmeal almond cookies. I saw a great recipe on line and forgot to save it and well now I can’t find it. Typical. I have been making my own raw almond milk which is so amazing and creamy and so much tastier than the carton version full of synthetic vitamins. I read that you can use the left over almond pieces as a meal or grind it into flour. Why waste it right. I also juice lemons and ginger and thought about adding them too. I figured I would replace the almond meal with the oat flour and just add the lemon and ginger what ratio do you think I should use for them as I am guessing they should just be a hin and not overpowering. I also thought about substituting the almond butter for coconut butter what do you think? Considering I am making almond cookies you probably am going to say use almond butter but I have a jar of coconut butter in the cupboard and need an excuse to use it. I was also wondering if I could substitute the agave with stevia as I like to keep my sugar content as low as possible. I look forward to hearing form you.

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello Naomi (my sisters middle name is Naomi, I always thought it was so pretty)

      Let’s see if I can help you out…

      Left over almond pulp is an amazing ingredient to have on hand! I wish I had an endless ample supply of it because I would use it all the time. I just don’t use enough of the milk end of it to create a stock pile. hehe I either freeze my pulp or dehydrate it and grind it to a flour. I use the “wet” pulp for recipes that I want to create a lighter texture in, like my raw breads. The dried and ground pulp, I use in cookie recipes mainly. BTW, you can do this with any nut pulp; walnuts, Brazil nut, pecan, etc. Great to get new and exciting flavor profiles.

      Regarding the lemon and ginger… what form of them are referring to? I am getting lost as to what your end result is. Sounds like we are creating a completely new cookie here. To make life easier… please list out exactly what ingredients you are wanting or needing to use and I will help you come up with measurements. :)

  5. Naomi says:

    Rolled Oats
    Almond meal (I don’t have a processor but do have a Blendtec)
    Pulp from juiced lemon and ginger
    Coconut butter (can get almond if you think it is better)
    Liquid Stevia (can also get powdered if you think it is better)

    I really do appreciate your help thanks!

    • amie-sue says:

      Hi Naomi…
      Wow, we are starting a whole new cookie here. I can give approx. but remember I haven’t tried it so you will want to taste test as you go and watch for texture. Always start small and work it up.

      This a rough recipe idea for you….

      Lemon Ginger Oat Cookies

      1 cup almond meal/flour
      1 cup oats (blend to flour or keep whole, depends on what texture you want)
      1/3 cup coconut flakes, shredded (again, blend or keep in larger pieces, depending on end texture)
      1/4 cup coconut butter, softened (might need more, see how this blends)
      Add the pulp from you lemon and ginger (I don’t know how much you have or how strong tasting it is so start with maybe a few Tbsp and work up)
      1/4 tsp sea salt (this elevated the sweet flavor in the cookie)
      1-2 tsp liquid stevia (taste test for sweetness level)
      1 tsp vanilla extract (helps to balance flavors)

      Optional: add dried cranberries? Or other dried fruits to increase sweetness if you want.

      Preparation for chunky cookie:

      In your blender (since you don’t have a food processor), break down the almonds to a small meal. Place in a medium bowl.
      Add oats, coconut flakes, dried fruit, lemon & ginger pulp, and salt. Toss together.
      In a small bowl combine; coconut butter, vanilla, and stevia. Mix well then add to the dry ingredients.
      Get in their with your hands if you want and mix everything really well. Taste test and adjust flavoring.
      Drop on teflex sheet that comes with the dehydrator.
      Dry at 115 degrees for approximately 8-10 hours. Or until desired dryness is reached.

      Preparation for creamier texture cookie:

      In your blender (since you don’t have a food processor), Break down the almonds to a small/ flour like meal. Place in bowl.
      Add oats and coconut flakes to the blender and break down to a flour. Add to almonds in the bowl.
      In a small bowl combine; coconut butter, vanilla, and stevia. Mix well then add to the dry ingredients. Mix well then add to the dry ingredients.
      Drop on teflex sheet that comes with the dehydrator.
      Dry at 115 degrees for approximately 8-10 hours. Or until desired dryness is reached.

  6. Naomi says:

    Great thank you! I will let you know how they turn out :)

  7. Jenny says:

    OMG!! I love your site! I am brand-new to Raw Vegan lifestyle (2 weeks) and your site has been such a life saver!! I have gone “cold turkey” because of my many health issues and am looking forward to a healthier body in 2014. I have not had anything cooked in 2 weeks: lots of salads, smoothies and dehydrated things that I made myself. I have all the equipment I need, but I am in New Hampshire looking at the snow outside my window, its hard to have a huge supply of fresh fruits and veggies.

    Your advice has been sooooo helpful! I am learning to soak everything and dehydrate and have ready and to also make some things ahead and freeze them!!

    I have to prepare “cooked” foods for my son and hubby, so I really needed to find your site!! LOL!

    Thankyou for saving my “raw” life! :)

    Oh! I forgot, my original reason for writing here was I am confused about the ingredient for these wonderful looking cookies (which I am drooling over your photos of them).

    I have soaked some “organic hulless raw oats” for the recommended time. Am I supposed to dehydrate them now to make:

    2 cups of oats
    and then take
    some of the dehydrated oats and make the
    1 cup of oat flour?

    I promise I will learn and get smarter… Im just a little lost at the moment! :P

    Thankyou again, for this glorious website. I have ordered some of your favorite supplies and will be getting more, they are so helpful! :)

    • amie-sue says:

      Good afternoon Jenny,

      What a pleasure to hear from you. Thank you for sharing part of your journey with me. It blesses me that you have found inspiration through out my site, I hope it continues. I am always here should you have questions and comments. I do my best to help when and were I can. :)

      Regarding your question (and please never worry about asking, clarification is always the best way to go!) For this recipe I used a total of 3 cups of oats… 2 cups were kept in their whole form and 1 cup was ground to a flour. This is all for texture reasons. Just to make sure we are on the same page, are the oats that you are using the ones that look more like a rice shape? Oats can be confusing as to what they are called and I just want to make I know exactly what you are using. I used the flat kind.

      I am on day two of sprouting organic hulless raw oats, so it’s funny that you brought this up. Did I answer your question? Have a blessed evening, amie sue

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