- Hide menu

Forbidden Black Rice

FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites

Forbidden-Rice12

Black rice offers all of the same health benefits of brown rice but it also packs some serious antioxidants.  Because of its dark color, black rice bran contains the same anthocyanin antioxidants found in blueberries or blackberries.  The bran is the outer coating of the rice kernel.  White rice is stripped of this which also strips away the nutrients.  So always look for whole grain rice.  Black rice is often referred to as “purple rice,” because when it’s soaked or cooked it changes from black to a deep purple or burgundy color.  When you sprout or cook the black rice, it brings a nutty, sweet flavor to the rice and softens the overall texture.

By soaking the forbidden rice, it will split open, make it soft  and make the inner nutrients available.  If you have a compromised digestive system, I recommend cooking it, thus making it easier to digest.  But only you can make that judgement call.  But just like any other grain, seed, or nut… it needs to be soaked prior to eating.  This is help release the physic acid that lurks within, which makes certain important minerals such as zinc and iron calcium and magnesium unabsorbable.  Soaking it will also speed up the cooking time if you choose that route.  In fact it will cut the time in half, which can be nice.

Grains can be acidic to the body, so to help with the acidity-alkaline balance, I added in a small piece (1″) of kombu (sea vegetable) during the cooking process.   Kombu contains the amino acid glutamine, a naturally sweet, superior flavor enhancer known as Umami.  One the dried sea veggie is soaked, it expands in size and feels a bit slimy.  It is very beneficial as it cuts down on gas and improves digestibility.  After the rice is through cooking, you can remove the kombu or you can diced it up and eat it along with your rice.

Forbidden-Rice13Ingredients: yields 3 cups

Preparation:

To sprout/soak:

  1. Place the rice in a fine mesh colander and rinse really well.  Place in a medium to large size glass bowl.
  2. Add water, vinegar to the rice.  Stir together and cover with a towel.  Leave on the countertop to “sprout” overnight or for at least 8 hours.

Enjoy raw:

  1. Drain the water and enjoy. OR

Enjoy cooked:

  1. Drain the soak water and rinse the rice before adding to the pan.
  2. Bring the water (2 cups water for every cup of rice), rice and kombu to a boil in a small heavy-bottomed saucepan.
  3. Decrease the temperature to maintain a simmer, cover, and cook until the rice is tender about 20 minutes.  If the rice wasn’t cooked, it could take up to 60 minutes to cook.
  4. Once done cooking, fluff the rice with a fork and enjoy.
  5. For a recipe idea check out my Raw Blueberry and Forbidden Black Rice Porridge

Forbidden-Rice1

Facebook Pinterest Twitter Plusone Stumbleupon

m4s0n501

8 thoughts on “Forbidden Black Rice

  1. David says:

    I was curious as I have never tried cooked sea veggies. Do they taste similar to soaked? I usually have only eaten them raw… Was curious on any extra benefits, or nutritional losses of cooked sea veggies vs raw?

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello David, I haven’t tested all sea veggie in the raw and/or cooked so I can’t say for sure what the taste difference is. The kombu will act as a nice thickener and the mucilage that is released helps to heal the intestinal lining and aid in digestion. Side by side, I don’t know what the nutritional data is and how it compares when raw or cooked. I know that it is a great aid for digestive system when I add it while cooking certain foods such as; soups, stocks and grains.

      I recommend that you read this site, I found it fascinating. http://www.envirohealthtech.com/sea_vegetation.htm

      Have a great day, amie sue

  2. Patsy says:

    When you say “capsule of probiotics” in the instructions, are you referring to the kombu? I am assuming that is what you mean, but I want to make sure. Thank you.

    • amie-sue says:

      Oh sorry guys… It was an experiment that I was doing by adding the probiotic. I decided to leave it out when I shared the recipe (but forgot to delete it from the preparation section until I found some back up to my theory. :)

  3. mirna says:

    Thank you for your inspiration, that is your love.
    Should Probiotics or vinegar be used for the soaking?

    • amie-sue says:

      Thank you Mirna… forget the probiotic for now… It was an experiment that I was doing by adding the probiotic. I decided to leave it out when I shared the recipe (but forgot to delete it from the preparation section until I found some back up to my theory. :) Sorry about that. amie sue

  4. Lisa H says:

    Hi Ami-sue, just curious…should all brown, red and black rice be soaked before cooking? I have IBS, so wouldn’t dare eat it uncooked.

    • amie-sue says:

      Yes indeed. Same soak process. Vitally important for digestive issues! I agree, cooked is better for you with IBS. Have a great day, amie sue

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

17 − 10 =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>