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Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bites (raw, vegan, gluten-free)

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Raw Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bite Recipe

Do these brownie bites cause the jitters?  No.  Do these brownies contain java (coffee)?  Nope.  Do these brownies contain zombies in them?  Nada!  Well, what the heck then?

I refer to these brownie bites as Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bites because they are energy giving for those times when you are walking around feeling depleted, like a walking zombie, and needing a little extra bounce in your step. Ever have those days? I sure have.    The recipe does contain coffee flavoring,  that is where the java comes into play.

So where does the “energy” come from?  Raw cacao!  Which gives you a high nutrient energy to get or keep you going.  Cacao is full of antioxidants and minerals that enhance both physical and mental well-being.  The majority of these antioxidants are water-soluble and when the fat is removed from the cacao bean the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scores almost double!

But raw cacao is not going to get all the glory here.  Oats!  Oats contain the energizing and stress-lowering B vitamin family, which helps transform carbs into usable energy. Oats are also low on the glycemic index because they have a lot of fiber. That means that your body gets a steady stream of energy, as opposed to a short-term spike, because the carbohydrates gradually flow into your bloodstream.

And let’s not forget Medjool dates… they provide “good carbs,” rating low to low/medium on the Glycemic Index (GI).  A diet rich in low-GI carbs keeps your blood sugar stable, helping maintain healthy weight and ensuring that you enjoy sustained energy without the crash you can get from snack bars and processed foods.

All of that bundled up in such a small treat!  Enjoy!

Ingredients:

yields 36 cubes

  • 1 1/4 cup rolled, gluten-free oats, soaked & dehydrated
  • 1 1/4 cups almond flour
  • 6 Tbsp raw cacao powder
  • 1/4 tsp Himalayan pink salt
  • 1/4 cup raw cacao nibs
  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pitted
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3/4 cup dried figs
  • 1/2 cup coconut butter, softened
  • 1 tsp coffee extract

Preparation:

  1. Be sure to use dry oats in this recipe, otherwise the wet oats will add to much moisture to the batter.
  2. In a food processor process the oats, almond flour, cacao powder and salt until no large pieces remain.  Place in a bowl.  Then mix in the cacao nibs.
  3. In the same food processor bowl combine the dates, water, figs, coconut butter and coffee extract.   Process until  the mixture is mostly smooth.
  4. Add the dry ingredients into the food processor and process until thoroughly combined.  The batter will stick together in a large ball.
  5. Line a baking pan or cookie sheet with plastic wrap  and press the mixture evenly into the pan.  I used the lip of my pan as my guide, which was 3/4″ high.
  6. Place in the fridge or freezer to chill.
  7. Remove and cut into small squares.  Coat with the cacao powder and enjoy!
  8. These should last a week on the counter or longer in the fridge or freezer.

The Institute of Culinary Ingredients™

  • Dates are an amazing ingredient for raw food recipes,  click (here) to read why.
  • What is raw cacao powder?
  • What is Himalayan pink salt and does it really matter?  Click (here) to read more about it.
  • Is coconut butter the same as coconut oil?  Click (here) to find out.
  • Are oats gluten-free?  Yes, read more about that (here).
  • Are oats raw?  Yes, they can be found.  Click (here) to learn more.
  • Do I need to soak and dehydrate oats?  Not required but recommended.  Click (here) to see why.
  • Learn how to grind you own flax-seeds for ultimate freshness and nutrition.  Click (here).

 

Raw Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bites are mixing with cacao nibs   Raw Gluten-Free Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bites

6 thoughts on “Jitter Java Zombie Brownie Bites (raw, vegan, gluten-free)

  1. Debbi says:

    Just curious why you soak and dehydrate rolled oats? They are not raw and they are already dried…so why do that step? Can you use sproutable oats? Sprout them, and dry them, so that this is raw?

    • amie-sue says:

      Good morning Debbi,

      I use raw oats whenever possible. I have to order them since I can never locate them locally. So yes you can use sproutable oats. Regardless, I always soak my oats to help remove any phytic acid. I find them much easier to digest. amie sue

  2. Lisa says:

    I was wondering if there was anything I could substitute for the coffee flavouring or if leaving it out would make a difference. I am one of those people that simply detests the taste or smell of coffee but these look so good.

  3. Danielle Davies says:

    is there anyway you can post nutritional info on these recipes? My moms diet for her cancer is no sugar and even though these sugar sources are natural, the body treats it the same as any other sugar. This recipe seems that it would have a lot. Thanks

    • amie-sue says:

      Hello Danielle,

      I don’t post the nutritional value of recipes because I don’t find it very accurate.

      A lot of the recipe / nutrient calculating programs out there have inaccurate information on each ingredient because the data is collection of foods that have been put in by everyday home cooks. A lot of errors happen because some people like to round up or down, which falsifies the data… or others may simply make an innocent error when putting the information in. I use to track my calories, fat, carbs, etc… but I found it so frustrating and untrustworthy.

      Plus, people will use different brands, qualities, and sub certain ingredients out. Also be aware that if you want to get as close to the real numbers as possible, you will want to enter in weights, not cups and teaspoons. One cup of dates can have many different weights based on how big or small they are and how much air is surrounding them as they piled in the measuring cup.

      Also, if you a recipe calls for a banana, the sugar level is going to be different based on how ripe it is. A green banana is more starchy and has less sugars then a brown spotted skinned banana, which will be high in natural sugars. Does that make sense? Based on all that, It would be wrong of me to put the nutritional data on my site.

      I am so sorry to hear that you mother has cancer and yes, sugar is the enemy. I was a personal chef for a gentleman who had stage 4 pancreatic cancer. I prepared his foods for 6 months, then I moved. This would not be a good recipe for you mothers based on the amount of dates and figs.

      If you really need to know or have an idea on the nutritional data, you can plug the information into recipe building programs. But I would focus more on making sure she is eating a whole food, clean diet, that has next to no sugars. Study up on alkalining foods. Look at each ingredient and in time you will be able to scan recipes and have a better understanding as to whether or not they would be suitable. You were right in questioning this one. Good job.

      Sending love and blessings to you and your mother. amie sue

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