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Clover Seed Sprouts – Jar method

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Sweet, crunchy clover sprouts are loaded with protein, calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as vitamins A, B, C, E. When Exposed to Light They Grow Green & Rich with Chlorophyll and Vitamins. Organic Red Clover Seeds Make a Zesty Addition to Sprout Salads. Clover seeds aren’t difficult to sprout, and each new crop takes less than a week. The sprouts can be eaten raw as a snack, in salads, on raw sandwiches, in smoothies and so forth.  I personally think these little guys are pretty darn amazing!

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbsp clover seeds
  • Water
  • 1/2 gallon sized canning jar with mesh screen

Preparation:

  1. Measure 3 tablespoon clover seeds into a  1/2 gallon sized, glass canning jar.  Fill the jar with water.
  2. Cover the jar with a fine mesh screen ( I use this one ) and secure the screen tightly to the jar with the canning jar ring or a rubber band.  Place the jar on your kitchen counter top or any place where the jar is at a normal room temperature and let the seeds soak over night. (8-12 hrs)
  3. Pour the water through the mesh the following morning, then rinse and drain again.  Tip the jar upside down at an angle and set it in a bowl to allow the water to continue to drain. I like using a dish drying rack.  See below.  I use a stainless steel dish drying rack for this.  It keeps the jars at a nice angle to help drain the water.
  4. Rinse and drain the clover seeds two to three times every day.  Continue to soak the clover seeds at night and rinse during the day until you see the beginning of tiny leaves.  At that time, move the jar near a sunny spot
  5. Drain the sprouts a final time when all the seeds have sprouted, which usually takes about five or six days.  Tip the jar upside down in a bowl and allow the sprouts to drain for eight to 12 hours, or until the sprouts feel dry to the touch.
  6. Using a salad spinner is a wonderful tool to use! Fill the container with water and then spin the sprouts dry.  This process helps to de-hull your sprouts.  The hulls are the outer shell of the seeds that are removed in the natural process of sprouting the seed.  You can eat them but often times they can be more difficult to digest.
  7. Store the clover sprouts in the refrigerator.  The sprouts can last up to six weeks, but the taste is better when the sprouts are fresh.

Tip:

  1. Before moving your sprouts to the fridge, they should be dry to the touch. Let our sprouts sit for 8-12 hours after their final rinse to make sure they are dry!  Again, using a salad spinner will speed up that process.  To dry them, spread paper towels on your counter top and spread the sprouts out, so air can dance around them, helping them to dry.
  2. You can transfer them to a plastic bag, use a special green produce bag, or you can use a glass or plastic container.

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Tip:

  1. Before moving your sprouts to the fridge, they should be dry to the touch. Let our sprouts sit for 8-12 hours after their final rinse to make sure they are dry!  Again, using a salad spinner will speed up that process.  To dry them, spread paper towels on your counter top and spread the sprouts out, so air can dance around them, helping them to dry.
  2. You can transfer them to a plastic bag, use a special green produce bag, or you can use a glass or plastic container.

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Equipment Used:

Sprouting Jar

1/2 gallon jar (love these and use them ALL the time for various things in my kitchen)

Sprouting Strainer Lid

Dish Rack Drainer

Salad Spinner

Fine Mesh Strainer

Top 10 Reason to Sprout

1. Only Pennies Per Serving- One tablespoon of seeds will fill a quart jar with several ounces of sprouts. A 4-ounce package will yield several pounds.

2. Simple and Easy- It take less than a minute per day to grow and prepare sprouts. Sprouts will grow nearly anywhere indoors, in any season. Sprouts require very little space and travel well. They are the ideal vegetables for campers, boaters and RVers. Complete, easy-to-follow instructions are provided in the sprouting kits, on the seed package labels and in the Handy Pantry’s book, Sprouting for Health in the new millennium.

3. Fresh and Fast- This “garden in your kitchen” grows very fast, in any kind of weather. No digging, planting, weeding, pests or chemicals involved. And there’s no long wait, as in seasonal outdoor gardens. Just 3 to 7 days to a bountiful, nutrition-packed harvest. When stored in your refrigerator, they will stay fresh for days- even weeks if rinsed properly.

4. Toxin-free Food-Sprouts are as sweet and pure as Nature intended food to be. The Handy Pantry supplies only natural, untreated seeds, with up to 99% rates of germination, grown especially for sprouting. Almost everything we carry is now organic.

5. Complete Foods-Sprouts are real health food. They are full of life- as you will see in how fast and luxuriously they grow. The right combination of sprouts contains everything needed for life and health. All their many nutritional elements are easily assimilated and readily available to your body. When home-grown, you know they are pure, and you can enjoy them at the peak of their perfection.

6. Tasty and Delicious-Bursting with flavor, you may be surprised how truly delectable they are. Enjoy them in salads, on sandwiches, stir-fried, steamed, or even baked in wholesome, home-made breads. You will find several recipe ideas in our book, Sprouting for Health in the 90’s.

7. Highly Nutritious-Several contain more protein than cooked meat-at a tiny fraction of the cost. The presence and balance of amino acids makes this protein more digestible. All sprouts are rich in vitamins, minerals, trace elements, enzymes, and fiber. When exposed to light, several become rich in chlorophyll. For specific nutritional qualities of each, see Sprouting for Health in the 90’s.

8. Low in Calories / Low Fat-One fully-packed cup of alfalfa sprouts contains only 16 calories. These are simple sugars for quick energy. Sprouts contain no cholesterol and provide several essential fatty acids. Sprouts are the perfect weight-loss and body-purification food for the 90’s.

9. Help Detox your Body-Chlorophyll helps cleanse and oxygenate the blood. Enzymes aid in the digestion and assimilation of nutrients, and contribute to the body’s life force. Fiber aids elimination and their lecithin helps the body get rid of cholesterol. A raw food diet is one of the best ways to detox your body.

10. Build your Immune System- Antioxidants protect you from radiation and toxic chemicals. They help the body to cleanse, detox, rebuild and heal itself. Sprouts are rich in antioxidants and help protect you from the health scourge of the 90’s— toxic build-up. Antioxidant enzymes are especially important, because they are essential for the proper function of the immune system. Sprouts are one of the best sources for these important nutrients.

10 reasons provided by: Wheatgrasskits.com


 

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11 thoughts on “Clover Seed Sprouts – Jar method

  1. Annie says:

    Hello again amie sue!
    Just checking…Do you really leave the seeds soaking during the night after the initial soaking, or is that a typo?
    I have only used a hemp bag, and would like to try the jar method.

    • amie-sue says:

      Good afternoon Annie,
      Yes’em. I soak them for 8-12 hours, basically over night. Then drain them, continuing on with the remaining process. I haven’t ever used the hemp bag method. Maybe we can teach one another new tricks. hehe

  2. Melissa says:

    Amie Sue,

    First let me say: This is truly the best raw food web site ever. It has so much detail, tons of recipes and lots of heart. You are so very generous to put this much information out to the public at no cost. I have a pretty good grasp of raw food prep, but here I have still learned tons!

    Second, I am just getting into regular sprouting and have a question about these clover sprouts you did. So you put them into the salad spinner with water and then spun them? Did that not just shoot the water everywhere? You must not have spun very long/hard. After which you still had to remove the seeds (floating on top) with a strainer or slotted spoon? Is that right? Just trying to get a feel for this method. Have only sprouted quinoa and buckwheat in a strainer sitting over a bowl with a towel draped over it (works great). Can’t get oats to sprout, but that’s a different monster all together.

    Thanks again for the web site and all the wonderful information.

    • amie-sue says:

      Good evening Melissa,

      Thank you very much for your inspirational words. :) You are very kind! I feel there is always something new to learn daily! So I am right there with you. To answer your questions:

      Q. So you put them into the salad spinner with water and then spun them?
      A. Yes

      Q. Did that not just shoot the water everywhere?
      A. No, there are 3 parts to a salad spinner; the lid, the hard clear plastic bowl (the outer bowl) and then there is an inner bowl that sits inside that has holes/slots in it for the water to get out of. The outer bowl catches the water. Check out this site as to what it looks like, http://www.oxo.com/p-491-salad-spinner.aspx

      Q. You must not have spun very long/hard. After which you still had to remove the seeds (floating on top) with a strainer or slotted spoon? Is that right?
      A. The pictures I posted follow the sequence of what I did. I put the sprouts in the salad spinner and filled it with water, the hulls then floated up to the top. I used the mesh strainer that you see in the picture to scoop out the hulls that had floated to the top. I then poured the water out and gave the salad spinner a few pumps. This helps to get most of the water off of them.

      I hope my answers helped you out. If they are confusing, keep asking! We will work it out. :)

      Have a blessed day! amie sue

  3. Susan says:

    AmieSue:

    Where did you purchase the stainless steel or wire drying rack?

    Thank you.

  4. Cayla says:

    Hey, I am looking to plant red clover seeds. But you guys are talking about just sprouting them. Is it possible to plant them after you sprout them? I’m looking for the purple flowers, not the greens themselves. I make a tea out of the flower heads. Let me know what you think.

    ~Cayla

  5. Ainslee says:

    Hi Nouveau Raw,

    Love your website. I’m wondering where you got your plastic sprout container? I’m on the hunt for them.

    Thanks
    Ainslee

    • amie-sue says:

      OH gosh Ainslee, I ordered those years ago through an on-line company that sold sprouting materials. If I come across them again, I will let you know. You can also use used berries containers from the grocery store. The hunt is on :) amie sue

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